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Mint in Skin Care

mint in skin care

Mint in Skin Care

If you follow me on my social media sites you know that I am an avid gardener. I am forever pulling mint out, it grows like a weed. It is one of the few plants that I grow that multiples like crazy. I love the fresh smelling aroma, it is distinct and hard to miss. In this article we will discuss how mint in skin care can help improve your skin’s appearance.

Mint is a natural astringent, it has salicylic acid which is found in many over the counter acne products. Mint’s astringent properties can help with acne prone skin. Salicylic acid works by loosening dead skin cells, this helps prevent dead cells from clogging the pores and causing acne.

Mint contains vitamins A and C which act as antioxidants. These antioxidants can help improve sun damaged skin as well as prevent further sun damage.

report published in the journal Food Chemistry indicates that spearmint extract has “good total phenolic and flavonoid contents” and “excellent antioxidant activity.”

Mint also contains B  vitamins such as riboflavin and folate, these vitamins can help reduce skin irritation.

Lets discuss some of the ways mint in skin care can be used.


Irritated skin

Mint can help calm the skin, you can use fresh mint on irritated skin. Simple grind the leaves and place on irritated area. A study published in the International Breastfeeding Journal suggested that peppermint water may help prevent cracked nipples in women who are breastfeeding.


Toner

Boil fresh mint leaves in water and use this concoction as a toner. Strain the leaves then use as a toner. You can keep it refrigerated for up to a week if you strain the leaves. As we mentioned earlier, mint contains Salicylic acid which can help prevent blemishes.

Exfoliation

Mint leaves can be used for exfoliation. Exfoliation help remove dead skin cells and increase cell turnover. Grind mint leaves,  gently rub into the skin in a circular motion, rinse then pat dry.

Mint face mask

Mint facial masks are especially beneficial for people with oily skin. Grind the leaves and add water to form a paste. Let sit for 5 to 15 minutes. Rinse the face and pat dry. The remainder should be thrown away.

Mint as a decongestant

Mint contains menthol which is a  natural  decongestant that helps to break up mucus. The broken down mucus is easier to expel which can help relieve congestion.

Mint for abdominal pain

Mint is also sold in capsules and used to help alleviate abdominal pain and gas. There some reports that mint may help with diarrhea and menstrual cramps.

According to WebMD,

  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Although some older studies suggest that peppermint oil does not affect IBS, most research shows that taking peppermint oil by mouth reduces stomach pain, bloating, gas, and bowel movements in people with IBS.”

Peppermint may be effective for headache. According to WebMD, “Applying a peppermint solution to the skin at the start of a migraine and again 30 minutes later seems to increase the percentage of patients who experience headache resolution.”

Some people have used peppermint oil for hair loss. Peppermint contains menthol which can increase blood flow , this stimulates hair follicles. I caution you to avoid placing essential oils directly on your skin, they should be diluted first to help avoid irritating the skin.

Chewing on mint can freshen your breath, this is why so many breath fresheners and gum include mint.

If you have mint growing in your back yard like I do or you pick it up at a grocery store you can try this simple home DIY recipe.

mint in skin careMint Lemon Water

Are you looking for an easy way to use mint? I think you will like this easy lemon water with mint recipe
INGREDIENTS
  • 2 quarts water
  • Juice of one lemon
  • 2 lemons, thinly sliced
  • Ice
  • Few sprigs of mint

 

According to Medical News Today,

Research published in Phytotherapy Research suggests that drinking two cups of spearmint tea a day, for 5 days could reduce the level of androgens in women with hirsutism. A second, 30-day study, of 41 women with polycystic ovary syndrome, produced similar results.”

Pregnant women

Mint has not been studies and should be avoided in pregnant women.

Tell me your tips for mint in skin care.

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10 thoughts on “Mint in Skin Care

  1. Such awesome info, Sharon! I had no idea mint was used for such a variety of things. Now I want to go plant some!;)

    1. Thanks for reading my post Dr. Anne

  2. Fascinating! I had no idea mint has so many holistic uses! I give my BFF a minty greenie as a “good boy” treat, and I love it in my toothpaste. Now I have a few more ideas.

    1. Thanks for the input Dr. Prevost.

  3. Well written and very informative article.I am definitely going to try the mint water.

  4. Great information on the various uses of Mint! Love it
    Dr Jen

    1. Thanks so much for taking the time to read Dr. Jen.

  5. Love this. Thanks for the great info!

  6. […] them myself; it’s natural and can save you a ton of money.  The Wrinkle Helper brings you Mint in skin care that describes the many uses of mint! Check it out and see what you […]

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